“Writing Home, WWII” letters series

I have been working up to writing this long series of transcribed letters for some time. It is to be an emotional journey, revisiting these stories once again. I hope you will enjoy them, and think of your family as you read.

family stories, joseph

Joseph Henry Thompson (known as ‘Mac’ in RAF circles) was born in June 1925. He was my Uncle, though I never knew him. The eldest of 4 children, and brother of my father (dad being the youngest).

He was born in Birmingham, England’s second largest city, in a relatively poor neighbourhood. His father had died in 1941, leaving his Mother a widow and WWII raging.

Joe ‘joined up’, along with thousands of other young men, in 1943 at the tender age of 18. The RAF was his chosen destination, and he said goodbye to his family and left for training in December, which is where these letters begin.

After 65 years secreted away in a plastic bag, the letters were re-discovered by my family last year. They had been in my Aunt’s possession (inherited after the death of my grandmother) but unseen by myself or my Dad.

They represent the most precious cargo, for these letters were written between 1943 and 1947. They were tokens of love between my grandmother (at home, husbandless, with 4 kids to support), and her eldest, handsome, brave boy Joseph who joined the RAF and went to fight the Nazis.

The letters are full of love, adventure, fear, deprivation, cold and disaster. Joe’s crew was shot down on their virgin mission in a Lancaster Bomber. He met a girl and talked of marriage. His mother wasn’t sure that this was a good idea.

Most of the letters from Joe to his mom ends with the words “God Bless and Keep Smiling – I do! xxxxx”family history letters home

These little bite-sized memoires are treasures enough in themselves, but for one fact. Joe survived the war and was posted to Singapore, but in 1947 the letters cease abruptly. Joe passed away from cancer in a military hospital at the age of just 22 years. Far from home, his mother restricted by the ability to travel due to the cost and the presence of 3 small children, he continued to write, wobbly-handed shorter notes, upbeat and witty.

His final letters tell her that he’s fine and she must ‘keep smiling’.

As a child, I failed to recognise the significance of the photograph which steadfastly took pride of place on the mantelpiece, year after year. As a grown woman and mother, I become emotional every time I see these letters, and ashamed of my former ignorance of the story of this man, my uncle, our family hero.

So I hope to do justice to Joe, so that he may be remembered always, and inspire others to recognise the value of the keepsakes which they own. Our objects hold wondrous family stories, and the people we love hold even more. It is a tragedy that we find such a lack of interest in ourselves that we fail to pass these stories on.

Time will make all things  which hold love precious, so I urge you to preserve your memories whilst they are still fresh. A birthday card written today to your child will be clutched to their chest in 20 years time when it is rediscovered.

A home is just a home, and a letter is just a letter, but your memories will last a lifetime.

Please subscribe to receive all letters in the series, and use the share buttons to involve your family and friends in Joe’s marvellous stories.

All Posts in this series:-

Letter 1, 29 December 1943 – arrival at RAF Recruitment Base for basic training

Letter 2, 31 December 1943 – getting to grips with 5 ‘Joes’

Letter 3, 5 January 1944 – confined to Barracks!

Letter 4, 8 Jan 1944 – a boxing champ and £1 in wages

Letter 5, 10 Jan 1944 – a theft and wrongful punishment

Letter 6 – 13 Jan 1944 – preparing to leave basic training camp

Letter 7 – 13 Jan 1944 – high jinx and punishing parades

Letter 8 – 14 Jan 1944 – being posted to Bridlington!!

Letter 9 – 18 Jan 1944 – Arrival at Bridlington (the dump!)

Letter 10 – 21 Jan 1944 – an introduction to firearms

Letter 11 – 25 Jan 1944 – fellow cadet killed in rifle accident

Letter 12 – 27 Jan 1944 – pork pies, live rounds and dim wits

Letter 13 – 29 Jan 1944 – 10 fillings & the Browning machine gun

Letter 14 – 31 Jan 1944 – Don’t worry, Mum

Letter 15 – 3rd Feb 1944 – 3 ‘Joes’ and top test scores!

Letter 16 – 10th Feb 1944 – Meeting Monty & military secrets

Letter 17 – 15th Feb 1944 – Clay pigeons and dirty washin’

Letter 18 – 17th Feb 1944 – 9 days ’til leave

Letter 19 – 21st Feb 1944 – A ‘date’ planned and condemned billets

Letter 20 – 6th March 1944 – Camp number 2 – Bridgnorth, Shropshire

Letter 21 – 13th March 1944 – Eatin’, stealin’ and flirtin’!

Letter 22 – 18th March 1944 – Gigalo Joe sits in his first gun turret

Letter 23 –   26th March 1944 – Meeting a War Hero

Letter 24 – 31st March 1944 – Man v the Potato Peeling Machine

Letter 25 – 6th April 1944 –  Passing Exams & Fending off Girls

Letter 26 – 10th April 1944 – Bonnie Scotland, here we come!

Letter 27 – 12th April 1944 – The coal heaving incident

Letter 28 – 15th April 1944 – ‘Mae Wests’ and Smashin’ WAAFs!

Letter 29 – 21st April 1944 – Bad rain stops play

Letter 30 – 24th April 1944 – Oops! Runaway guns!

Letter 31 – 27th April 1944 – Cutting the engines at 8000 feet!

Letter 32 – 29th April 1944 – Neighbourly gossip

Letter 33 – 8th May 1944 – Runway calamities and shooting seagulls

Letter 34 – 14th May 1944 – The one where Joe plays Matchmaker

Letter 35 – 20th May 1944 – Exams and pocket money

Letter 36 – 23rd May 1944 – Stripes and Beret in the bag

Letter 37 – 14th June 1944 – Welcome to the Sergeants’ Mess!

Letter 38 – 15th June 1944 – Long Johns? Are you kidding me?

Letter 39 – 17th June 1944 – Painting on Numbers

Letter 40 – 22nd June 1944 – “She’s a sweet kid, I like her a lot”

Letter 41 – 23rd June 1944 – A scorched backside and pigs’ toenails

Letter 42 – 23rd June 1944 – Bale Out and Dinghy Drills

Letter 43 – 24th June 1944 – Crew Tactics

Letter 44 – 28th June 1944 – Turning 19

Letter 45 – 2nd July 1944 – Coffee, Music and Sarnies at 16000 feet

Letter 46 – 9th July 1944 – Sleeping with your clothes on

Letter 47 – 13th July 1944 – Gunning with Cine Film

Letter 48 – 22nd July 1944 – Burning in the Bomb Bays

Letter 49 – 26th July 1944 – Complimented by the boss

Letter 50 – 2nd August 1944 – Stinky feet and bringing a girl home to mum

Letter 51 – 5th August 1944 – A letter from Mum

Letter 52 – 8th August 1944 – RAF incompetence and final exams

Letter 53 – 10th August 1944 – Family news and clean socks

Letter 54 – 20th August 1944 – “Oh to devastate an apple pie!”

Letter 55 – 2nd September 1944 – On the move again

Letter 56 – 4th September 1944 – Marching around a dump

Letter 57 (Olive) – 4th September 1944 – A quick note from Mum

Letter 58 – 7th September 1944 – Marking Time

Letter 59 – 10th September 1944 – Is the war nearly over?

Letter 60 – 11th September 1944 – A prang

Letter 61 – 13th September 1944 – All the ‘gen’ from home

Letter 62 – 17th September 1944 – 2 miles to breakfast

Letter 63 – 19th September 1944 – Was there a time before the black-out?

Letter 64 (Olive) – 21st September 1944 – Fattening cockerels for Christmas

Letter 65 – 22nd September 1944 – A spot of bother

Letter 66 (Olive) – 22nd September 1944 – A missing parcel

Letter 67 – 23rd September 1944 – Good boy, Bad boy

Letter 68 –  5th October 1944 – Funeral Duties

Letter 69 – 6th October 1944 – Illness back home

Letter 70 – 7th October 1944 – Nose-dive over the handlebars!

Letter 71 – 11th October 1944 – Flu and mourning

Letter 72 – 13th October 1944 – Mum’s new job back home

Letter 73 – 13th October 1944 – Flying Day and Night

Letter 74 – 20th October 1944 – Closer to the Action

Letter 75 – 18th October 1944 – Hi Mom, I’m getting Married!

Letter 76 – 20th October 1944 – Mom receives the engagement news

Letter 77 – 23rd October 1944 – ‘to have a Mother such as you’

Letter 78 – 23rd Octobr 1944 –  ’10 year old parsnip wine’ 

Letter 79 – 27th October 1944 – ‘Saturday night at the Pictures’

Letter 80 – 31st October 1944 – ‘Your brother is reading the Encyclopaedia’

Letter 81 – 15th November 1944 –  ‘The Lancaster Bomber’

Letter 82 – 17th November 1944 – ‘Final, final, final exams’

Letter 83 – 20th November 1944 – ‘Money from the pub’

Letter 84 – 20th November 1944 – ‘Grounded’

Letter 85 – 22nd November 1944 – ‘a photo of the crew’

Letter 86 – 24th November 1944 – ‘I wonder if you are flying over me now?’

Letter 87 – 26th November 1944 – ‘Civvy food’

Letter 88 – 27th November 1944 – Scrounging and hoarding’

Letter 89 – 28th November 1944 – ‘Finally on a squadron’

Letter 90 – 4th December 1944 – ‘Beanos and Brylcreem’

Letter 91 – 5th December 1944 – ‘Missing your long legs on the hearth’

Letter 92 – 7th December 1944 – ‘A radio!’

Letter 93 – 9th December 1944 – ‘A for Able’

Letter 94 – 12th December 1944 – ‘Virgin Ops tomorrow!’

Letter 95 – 15th December 1944 – ‘First raid ends in disaster’

Letter 96 – 24th December 1944 – ‘Missing Christmas’

Letter 97 – 25th December 1944 – ‘Merry Bloody Christmas’

Letter 98 – 29th December 1944 – ‘Beaver bristles and Christmas cake’

Letter 99 – 31st December 1944 – ‘Vohwinkel doesn’t ‘Voh’ any more!’

Letter 100 – 1st January 1945 – ‘Wishing you many happy landings’

Letter 101 – 4th January 1945 – ”Jumped’ by a fighter on night ops’

Letter 102 – 8th January 1945 – ‘Mail drought’

Letter 103 – 10th January 1945 – ‘Raid on Munich’

Letter 104 – 15th January 1945 – ‘Failed ‘Ops”

Letter 105 – January 1945 – ‘You are the last thing on my mind at night..’

Letter 106 – 19th January 1945 – “6 Ops and 200 hours of flying”

Letter 107 – 22nd January 1945 – “Plenty to chin-wag about”

Letter 108 – 30th January 1945 – “A weekend in Liverpool”

Letter 109 – 1st February 1945 – “Tickets for the Panto”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

134 responses to ““Writing Home, WWII” letters series

  1. What a wonderful treasure to have! So much from those times have been lost and forgotten. A wonderful way to keep your family history and story alive. (sorry history buff here- my focus is civil war and WWI and WWII)

  2. Pingback: Letters Home, WWII; Letter 4, 8 Jan ’44. « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  3. Pingback: Letters Home, WWII; Letter 5, 10 Jan ’44. « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  4. Pingback: Joe’s Letters Home, WWII; Letter 6, 13 Jan ’44. « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  5. Pingback: Joe’s Letters Home, WWII: Punishing schedules & High Jinx « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  6. Pingback: Joe’s Letters Home, WWII: Posted to Bridlington! « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  7. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: Arrival at Bridlington for 6 weeks training « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  8. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: Introduction to firearms…. « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  9. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: A fellow RAF cadet is killed in training « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  10. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: Pork Pie, Live Rounds and ‘Dim Wits’ « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  11. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: 10 fillings & the Browning machine gun « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  12. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: Don’t worry, Mum « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  13. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: Three ‘Joes’ and Top Test Scores « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  14. These are really brilliant and it is great to see some one bothering to make this material available – family ‘archives’ are important, if we allow them to lost, forgotten or unshown we fail our ancestors.

  15. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Clay Pigeons & Dirty Washin’” « SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  16. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “9 days ’til leave!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  17. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A ‘Date’ planned, & Condemned Billets!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  18. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Camp Number Two – Bridgnorth, Shropshire” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  19. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Eatin’, Stealin’ and Flirtin’” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  20. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Gigalo Joe sits in his first gun turret” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  21. These letters are just wonderful. It’s the detail that makes them so important, historically. My dad wrote about the exact kit he was issued with too: years after he was able to remember this with great clarity.
    I see Joe went to Bridlington rather than Whitley Bay. I was born in Whitley Bay and became very excited that he might be moved there!

    • You’re so right, Trish. Every tiny detail brings the era to life. Joe writing about the phone box being full of coins and having to call the operator – I bet he never thought there’s be a day when we’d laugh at such a then-‘modern’ thing! Thanks for your lovely comment. By the way, I LOVE Whitley Bay!!

  22. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Meeting a War Hero” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  23. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Reality Bites: A Pal is Killed” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  24. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Man vs the Potato Peeling Machine” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  25. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Passing Exams & Fending Off Girls!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  26. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Bonnie Scotland, here we come” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  27. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “The Coal Heaving Incident” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  28. Pingback: National Archives how to find War Diaries - World War 2 Talk·

  29. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “‘Mae Wests’ & Smashin’ WAAFs” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  30. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “‘Bad rain stops play” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  31. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Oops. Runaway Guns!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  32. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Cutting the engines at 8000 feet! | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  33. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Neighbourly Gossip” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  34. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Runway Calamaties & Shooting Seagulls” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  35. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “The one where Joe plays Match Maker” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  36. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Exams & Pocket Money” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  37. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Stripes and Beret in the Bag!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  38. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Welcome to the Sergeants’ Mess!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  39. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Long Johns? Are you kidding me?!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  40. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  41. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: Lest we forget | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  42. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “She’s a sweet kid, I like her a lot” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  43. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A scorched backside & pigs’ toenails” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  44. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Bale-Out and Dinghy Drills” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  45. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Crew Tactics” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  46. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Turning 19″ | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  47. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Coffee, Music & Sarnies at 16000ft” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  48. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Sleeping with your clothes on” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  49. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Gunning with Cine Film “ | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  50. What a memorable book these letters would be. So much of reality history is found in letters, perhaps still preserved in boxes or trunks, waiting to be found. Our family has packets of letters written in Russian by our parents in the early 20th century. They are fading, waiting to be translated. Your letters inspire us to move on with it.

  51. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Burning in the bomb bays!” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  52. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Complimented by the boss” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  53. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Stinky feet & bringing a girl home to mum” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  54. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A letter from Mum” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  55. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “RAF incompetence and Final exams” | SaveEveryStep – family stories past & present·

  56. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Family news and clean socks” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  57. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Oh, to devastate an apple pie” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  58. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “On the move again” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  59. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Marching around a dump” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  60. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A quick note from Mum” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  61. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Marking time” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  62. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Is the war nearly over?” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  63. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A ‘Prang’” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  64. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “All the ‘gen’ from home” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  65. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “2 miles to breakfast” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  66. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Was there a time before the Black-out?” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  67. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Fattening cockerels for Christmas” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  68. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A spot of bother” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  69. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A missing parcel” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  70. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Bad boy, Good boy” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  71. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Illness back home” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  72. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Nose-dive over the handlebars!” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  73. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “‘Flu and Mourning” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  74. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Mum’s new job back home” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  75. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Flying day and night” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  76. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Closer to the action” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  77. Pingback: Letters from WWII: The 66th anniversary of Joe’s loss | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  78. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Hi Mom, I’m getting married” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  79. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Mom receives the engagement news” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  80. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “To have a mother such as you…” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  81. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “10 year old parsnip wine…” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  82. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Saturday night at the Pictures” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  83. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Your brother is reading the Encyclopaedia” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  84. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “The Lancaster Bomber” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  85. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Final, final, final exams” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  86. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Money from the Pub” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  87. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Grounded” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  88. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A photo of the Crew” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  89. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “70 years ago this week” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  90. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “I wonder if you are flying over me now?” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  91. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Civvy food” | SaveEveryStep - family stories past & present·

  92. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Scrounging and hoarding” | SaveEveryStep·

  93. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Finally on a Squadron!” | SaveEveryStep·

  94. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Beanos & Brylcream” | SaveEveryStep·

  95. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Missing your long legs on the hearth…” | SaveEveryStep·

  96. Pingback: Blogoversary | SaveEveryStep·

  97. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A radio!” | SaveEveryStep·

  98. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A for ‘Able’” | SaveEveryStep·

  99. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Virgin ‘Ops’ tomorrow!” | SaveEveryStep·

  100. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “First raid ends in disaster” | SaveEveryStep·

  101. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Missing Christmas” | SaveEveryStep·

  102. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Merry bloody Christmas” | SaveEveryStep·

  103. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Beaver bristles & Christmas cake” | SaveEveryStep·

  104. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Vohwinkel doesn’t ‘Voh’ any more!!!” | SaveEveryStep·

  105. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Wishing you many happy landings” | SaveEveryStep·

  106. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “‘Jumped’ by a fighter on night ‘ops’” | SaveEveryStep·

  107. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Mail drought” | SaveEveryStep·

  108. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Raid on Munich!!” | SaveEveryStep·

  109. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Failed ‘Op’s’” | SaveEveryStep·

  110. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “You are the last thing on my mind at night…” | SaveEveryStep·

  111. I wonder if your grandparents home still exists or if it was bombed and if it does exist how its changed over all these years.

    • It’s still there for sure. Not changed much apart from the occupants! The suburbs escaped the worst of the bombing thankfully

  112. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Six Ops and 200 hours of flying” | SaveEveryStep·

  113. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Plenty to chin-wag about” | SaveEveryStep·

  114. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “A weekend in Liverpool” | SaveEveryStep·

  115. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Tickets for the Panto” | SaveEveryStep·

  116. Pingback: Joe’s Letters, WWII: “Dortmund – ‘coned’ in spotlights!” | SaveEveryStep·

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